Abstract

When selective audiovisual stimuli become unbearable: a case series on pediatric misophonia

Author(s): Patricia L Johnson, Troy A Webber, Monica S Wu, Adam B Lewin, Tanya K Murphy, Eric A Storch

Background: Those with misophonia experience distress in response to specific sounds (e.g., sounds of eating) and often to repetitive movements (e.g., seeing leg shaking). The literature on misophonia is sparse but it is gaining increased clinical attention.

Methods: We report on four cases to highlight clinical characteristics associated with misophonia seen in a pediatric treatment setting.

Results: Patients typically responded to triggers with avoidant behavior or made attempts to stop the production of the trigger. Misophonia caused varying levels of impairment and was often seen as the patient’s primary complaint. Onset began in childhood and demonstrated increasing severity until the point at which evaluation and treatment was sought. Family accommodation was consistently present and reinforced the patient’s difficulties.

Conclusion: Misophonia is distinguished from existing psychological and auditory disorders that have known etiologies and treatments. Further research is required to understand the neurological and psychological underpinnings of the disorder, and identify appropriate treatments.


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