Electroencephalogram Neurofeedback Treatment for Taiwanese Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Author(s): Pinchen Yang, I-Ting Li, Tai-Ling Liu

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common neuropsychiatric disorder in children. Stimulant drugs treatment has been one of the major therapeutic options for children with ADHD. Roughly 34% of children are medication non-responders and many others are partial responders. Neurofeedback treatment is a promising alternative which is supported by western extensive peer-reviewed literature. However, there are limited empirical
data of the effect of neurofeedback in Asian population. The purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of neurofeedback on the core symptoms and neuropsychological measures in Taiwanese children with ADHD who were partial responders to pharmacotherapy. Twenty-six children (7-12 years) with DSM-5 diagnosed ADHD entered this study. Subjects of neurofeedback group (N=13) received medication together with 20 sessions/ 8 weeks of neurofeedback training targeting on decreasing Theta brain wave of electroencephalogram. Control group children (N=13) received medication only. For the baseline and 8-week follow up assessments, all children received Continuous Performance test and their primary caregivers completed ADHD core symptoms rating scales. Significant improvements were noted on attention test and core ADHD symptoms measures for subjects who received addon
neurofeedback training as compared with the control group. The study supported the positive effect of neurofeedback training as add-on treatment for Taiwanese children with ADHD. Twenty sessions of neurofeedback can be beneficial in a short term follow up.

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