Abstract

Association of Stress Coping Strategies with Suicidality in Young Adults: The Mediation Effects of Depression, Anxiety and Hostility

Author(s): Wen-Jiun Chou, Chih-Hung Ko, Ray C Hsiao, Chung-Ping Cheng, and Cheng-Fang Yen

Abstract

Objective: Stress-coping strategies have been found to play a unique role in suicidality. Aims: To examine the mediating effects of depression, anxiety, and hostility on the relationship between stresscoping strategies and suicidality in 500 young adults.

Methods: Stress-coping strategies, suicidality, depression, anxiety, and hostility were measured using the Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Scale, the questionnaire from the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised Scale.

Results:The results of the separate analysis indicated that active coping and positive reinterpretation and growth were associated with low depression and anxiety and consequently associated with a low risk of suicidality. By contrast, denial, behavioral disengagement, and mental disengagement were associated with high depression, anxiety, and hostility and consequently associated with a high risk of suicidality. Focusing on and venting of emotions was associated with high hostility and consequently associated with a high risk of suicidality. The results of the joint regression analysis revealed that focusing on and venting of emotions and behavioral disengagement were associated with high depression and consequently associated with a high risk of suicidality.

Conclusion: Motivating people who use the strategies of focusing on and venting of emotions and behavioral disengagement to change their stress-coping strategies is crucial. To reduce the risk of suicidality, depression should be surveyed routinely during the process of coping-skill training programs.


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