Abstract

Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination in Nondemented Patients after Stroke

Author(s): Dagmar Fiedorova, Petra Krulova, Pavel Ressner,Vladena Jaremova, Jana Slonkova, Michal Bar, David Skoloudik, Hana Zakopcanova Srovnalova

Abstract

Introduction: Cognitive deficit after stroke is common, and beginning cognitive rehabilitation as soon as possible is important to minimize the consequences of the impairment. The aim of this study was to use Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination to compare cognitive function in nondemented and nondepressed stroke patients, 3–6 months after the stroke, with sex- and age-matched controls.

Materials and Methods: A total of 156 participants were included (72 controls: 19 men, mean age 64.5 ± 12.4 years; 84 patients after stroke: 54 men, mean age 62.2 ± 9.0 years).

Results: Statistically significant differences were identified between controls and stroke patients in total Addenbrooke’s score (stroke patients, 86.2 points vs controls, 91.2 points; p<0.01), Verbal Production domain (stroke patients, 9.8 points vs controls, 11.5 points; p<0.01), and Memory domain (stroke patients, 19.5 points vs controls, 21.7 points; p<0.01). The difference was also statistically significant between subgroups of stroke patients and controls: patients with a right-sided brain lesion differed from controls in total scores (88.3 vs 91.3 points, respectively; p<0.05) and Verbal Production domain scores (9.9 vs 11.5 points, p<0.01), as did patients with left-sided brain lesions in total score (83.9 vs 91.3 points; p<0.01) and Memory (18.6 vs 21.7 points; p<0.01) and Verbal Production (9.6 vs 11.5 points; p<0.01) domains.

Conclusion: This study shows the usability of Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination 3–6 months after a stroke to detect mild cognitive decline, providing a basis for initiating cognitive rehabilitation as soon as possible.


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